These Are The Most Popular Healthy Foods of 2017

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com. 

Every year, certain ingredients and dishes emerge as trendy “must-haves”—even if it’s something we’ve been eating for centuries. Just a few years ago, for example, no one had even heard of quinoa (which has been around for at least 5,000 years), and now not a day goes by when we don’t see it on a menu.

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These foods and popular ingredients aren’t just being whipped up by chefs or served in popular restaurants. They’ve become mainstream amongst home cooks across America, and thousands of eaters are also ordering them through delivery services. UberEATS has seen a surge in fresh, nutritious delivery orders (so long, pizza and burgers), so they compiled a list of the top 20 healthy food trends for 2017. The data is based on UberEATS order patterns so far this year.

RELATED: 9 Healthy Kitchen Staples That Cost Under $1 Per Serving

Unsurprisingly, avocado is at the top of the list—it seems this trend is here to stay. According to their data, the fruit is the most popular healthy food in more than 16 cities across the country. Kale has dropped to number 8 on the list, making way for poke (a Hawaiian raw fish salad), edamame, radishes, and pickles. Bulgur and brown rice have replaced quinoa as the resident grains/seeds in the top 20.

The fact that tofu rounds out the top 10 is a nod to people re-thinking the amount of meat they consume—and how it appears on their plates. More and more, in home kitchens, restaurants, and new cookbooks, we’re seeing veggies take center stage with meat as a side, or a garnish. Check out the full list below, and use it as an opportunity to try out some new healthy ingredients this year.

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  1. Avocado
  2. Poke
  3. Edamame
  4. Radish
  5. Pickles
  6. Cucumber
  7. Celery
  8. Kale
  9. Pho
  10. Tofu
  11. Carrots
  12. Broccoli
  13. Asparagus
  14. Bulgur
  15. Chickpea
  16. Cabbage
  17. Coconut
  18. Brown Rice
  19. Bok Choy
  20. Bone Broth

Source: Nutrition

Alcohol Is Good for Your Heart—Most of the Time

This article originally appeared on Time.com. 

Alcohol, in moderation, has a reputation for being healthy for the heart. Drinking about a glass of wine for women per day, and two glasses for men, is linked to a lower risk of heart attack, stroke and death from heart disease. (Drinking too much, of course, negates these benefits and increases the risk of heart problems.)

Now, a new study of nearly two million people published in The BMJ adds more evidence that moderate amounts of alcohol appear to be healthy for most heart conditions—but not all of them.

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The researchers analyzed the link between alcohol consumption and 12 different heart ailments in a large group of U.K. adults. None of the people in the study had cardiovascular disease when the study started.

People who did not drink had an increased risk for eight of the heart ailments, ranging from 12% to 56%, compared to people who drank in moderation. These eight conditions include the most common heart events, such as heart attack, stroke and sudden heart-related death. Non-drinkers had a 33% higher risk of unstable angina—a condition in which the heart doesn’t get enough blood flow—and a 56% higher risk of dying unexpectedly from heart disease, compared to people who drank a glass or two of alcohol a day.

RELATED: How Alcohol Affects Your Body

But alcohol does not seem to provide protection against four less common heart problems: certain types of milder strokes, which result from brief periods when blood flow to parts of the brain are blocked, and cases of bleeding in the brain.

The study’s findings are particularly interesting because the researchers separated drinkers into categories that are typically lumped together in these kinds of studies. “Non-drinkers” often include people who have never drank, as well as those who quit drinking (who may have been heavy drinkers in the past, and so may have a higher risk of heart problems). This may have inflated the risk of non-drinkers; in some cases, grouping people this way might make drinking alcohol look better for the heart than it actually is.

It’s not clear from the current study why alcohol lowers the risk of some heart conditions and not others. But Steven Bell, a genetic epidemiologist at University of Cambridge and the study’s lead author, says that another study designed to answer that question is currently underway. “We are unpacking how different risk factors are associated with each different disease,” he says. Future studies will also tease apart whether different types of alcohol—wine versus beer or spirits, for example—have varying effects on the risk of heart disease.

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In the meantime, Bell says that the results should reassure people who drink a few glasses of alcohol each week. But it shouldn’t compel people who don’t currently drink to pick up the habit in order to stave off heart disease. Because alcohol carries a risk of liver disease, there are safer ways to lower risk, he says, such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet.

Source: Nutrition

Eating at Night Can Make You Gain Weight, But What If You're Actually Hungry?

You're just about to crawl into bed…and hunger strikes. You know late-night snacks aren't great for your waistline, or your slumber. So should you try to ignore the craving—or eat something small? And if so, what should you have? Here’s my advice about what to do, and how to ward off pre-bedtime hunger in the first place.

First, figure out if you're actually hungry

The first step is to determine if you’re truly in need of nourishment, or experiencing a false hunger triggered by habit, anxiety, or the desire for a reward. To do that, check in with your body: Do you have physical signs of hunger, like a growling tummy? When did you last eat, and what did you have?

For most people, a well-balanced meal (such as a generous amount of veggies plus lean protein, healthy fat, and a bit of carbs) should leave you feeling full for about four hours. So if you ate a healthy dinner less than four hours ago, and you don’t have any physical symptoms of hunger, blame “mind hunger.”

If your craving is driven by habit (for example, maybe you always pair snacking with watching Netflix before bed), mix up your routine. Do something else with your hands as you veg out in front of the TV. Try doodling, playing with a Rubik’s Cube, or doing anything else that keeps you occupied.

If your hunger is triggered by emotions (like stress, or anger), choose another way to self-soothe. Listen to a five-minute guided meditation. Or see if writing in a journal will do the trick.

Eating when you aren’t physically hungry is like putting on a sweater when you’re not cold: It’s not helpful, and can just make you more uncomfortable. On the flip side, getting to the root of what’s steering you to the kitchen can help improve your mental well being, and break the pattern of distracting yourself with food.

RELATED: Best and Worst Foods for Sleep

Snack smarter

Let's say you establish that you really are physically hungry. Now try to assess how hungry you feel. Do you just need a few bites to take the edge off? If so, have a quarter cup of nuts or seeds (a serving about the size of a golf ball). The protein, good fat, and fiber they contain will fill you up, but not leave you feeling stuffed and sluggish. What's more, as much as 30% of the calories in nuts aren’t digestible, which means the calorie count may be a third less than what the label states. And that's ideal since you're about to be sedentary for about seven to eight hours.

If you think you’re too hungry for just nuts, have some fruit too. Kiwis are a good choice, since they’ve been shown to help with sleep. A study published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men and women who ate two kiwis one hour before bed fell asleep more than 35% faster, slept more soundly, and experienced a 13.4% increase in total sleep time, compared to before the kiwi intervention.

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Rethink your dinner

If you’re so hungry that nuts, seeds, and fresh fruit won’t cut it, you may want to reexamine the composition and timing of your dinner meal. I’ve had clients who weren't eating enough at dinner and then had trouble falling asleep. Or they'd wake up in the middle of the night to binge. That's because a low-calorie soup, salad, or diet frozen dinner at 7:00 pm just isn’t going to keep you sated until a 10 or 11 o'clock bedtime.

For a healthy and satisfying dinner, make veggies the bulk of your meal. The ideal amount is at least two cups in their raw state (about the size of two baseballs). Add protein from seafood, poultry, eggs, or pulses; and a good fat like avocado or EVOO. Top it all off with a small portion of whole food carbs like spaghetti squash, quinoa, or sweet potato.

Bonus: This type of balanced meal will also help you catch higher-quality Zs. Recent research suggests that eating too little fiber and too much sugar and saturated fat (the kind found in fatty meat and dairy products) can disturb sleep, while higher fiber meals lead to deeper slumber.

Cynthia Sass is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and consultant for the New York Yankees. See her full bio here.

Source: Nutrition